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Frequently Asked Questions


What are 'managed motorways'?

'Managed motorways' is the term used to describe motorways that have information, communications and control systems incorporated in and alongside the road. These technology-based systems are deployed to actively manage traffic flows and safety, as well as deliver other important outcomes for road users such as better travel reliability. They comprise an integrated package of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) interventions, which includes speed and lane use management.

The Managed Motorway Project is an initiative to improve safety and traffic flow on the South Eastern (SE) Freeway between Crafers and Stirling, through the use of Intelligent Transport Systems, including hard shoulder and electronic signs. Currently, almost 54,000 vehicles use this section of the freeway each day. 

The project will involve converting the existing emergency lane into a third travel lane and the implementation of a Managed Motorway on both the up and down tracks of the SE Freeway.


Why are we doing the project and what is the timing of works? 

The Managed Motorway Measures Project is an initiative to improve safety and traffic flow on the South Eastern (SE) Freeway between Crafers and Stirling, through the use of Intelligent Transport Systems, including hard shoulder running and electronic signs. Currently, almost 54,000 vehicles use this section of the SE Freeway each day.

The project will involve converting the existing emergency lane into a third travel lane and the implementation of a Managed Motorway on both the up and down tracks of the SE Freeway.

The SE Freeway is the most direct corridor between Adelaide and Melbourne, as well as providing a vital link in moving freight between eastern and central Australia. With increasing demand of commuter and freight traffic, the section between Crafers and Stirling is heavily impacted during peak periods with increased travel times. The Managed Motorway measures include variable speed limits and a Lane Use Management system, which will enable the allocation and control of lanes across the Freeway.

Main works are expected to commence early 2020, with project completion expected in late 2020. 

The $14.2 million project is jointly funded by the South Australian and Australian Governments.


Will there be noise barriers installed? Was there any noise assessment done?

The Department of Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) undertakes noise assessments and mitigation in accordance with its Road Traffic Noise Guideline. This guideline is the department’s response to satisfying its General Environmental Duty under Section 25 of the Environment Protection Act 1993, in relation to infrastructure works.

An assessment was undertaken by a third party consultant for the South Eastern Freeway, Managed Motorways Measures Project, and it was determined that noise mitigation is not required on this occasion as the project does not fall within the criteria of a redeveloped road, and because noise is not expected to significantly change.


Will noise-reducing asphalt be used?

Open Graded Asphalt will be used for the project, which provides reduced noise levels.


Will there be a reduction in the speed limit between Crafers and Stirling?

The design has been developed in accordance with Australian design guidelines and standards, and the current speed limits will remain unchanged. 

Currently, the speed limits are 90 kilometres per hour (km/h) for the west (Adelaide) bound carriageway and 100 km/h for the east (Murray Bridge) bound carriageway.

Notwithstanding the above, in conjunction with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV), variable speed limit signage will enable DIT’s Traffic Management Centre to remotely manage traffic, adjusting speed limits during poor weather conditions, road works or other incidents on this section of the Freeway.


Will there be direct communication with truck drivers telling them to slow down

The facility to directly communicate with truck drivers telling them to slow down is not in the current project scope.  


Will vegetation be required to be removed?

The project will have minimal impact to vegetation and will be localised to the confines of the existing freeway.  The majority of vegetation clearance will be required to provide vehicle clearance and achieve sight distance requirement. It is expected that this clearance will consist mainly of pruning with minimal full tree removal. The exact extent of vegetation removal will not be known until the detailed design is completed early next year.

The impacts to vegetation will be minimised, as much as practically possible. Any vegetation clearance will be offset by payment to the department's Amenity Planting Fund.  These monies may be used on specific environmental projects run by the department, or may be provided to a council or conservation-focussed organisation to fund environmental programs.