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DPTI Matters - 31 May 2019

A word from the Chief Executive


Fatality Free Friday

Today is Fatality Free Friday across Australia, when everyone is encouraged to place extra attention on road safety.

The national campaign is designed for drivers to think about road safety for one special Friday in the year in a bid to reduce the day’s death toll from a statistical 3.3 deaths, to zero.

If drivers actively concentrate on safe driving for just one day, they are more likely to drive more safely over the next few days and, over time, to think about road safety every day of the year.

In Australia there are about 1100 to 1200 road fatalities each year and for every death, approximately 10 people are seriously injured. Already this year, more than 50 people have lost their lives on South Australian roads. Visit the Fatality Free Friday website more information and to pledge your support.


Bridge demolition

Congratulations to the Northern Connector Project team, who worked around the clock last weekend to successfully and safely conduct the demolition of the Craig Gilbert Bridge over the Port River Expressway.

The demolition works removed 520 cubic metres of concrete from the structure and will now enable further construction works for the Southern Interchange, which will connect the South Road Superway, Port River Expressway, Salisbury Highway and Northern Connector.

The new bridge over the Port River Expressway, constructed as part of the Northern Connector project will retain the Craig Gilbert name, in honour of the former Tonkin Consulting Managing Director, whose innovative design was used for the original bridge.

Thanks to those who worked tirelessly to complete the works. You can view a video of the demolition works below.


Tram wrap

The running of a tram wrapped in Aboriginal artwork has become a highlight of each year over the past decade and it’s been great to see it making an impact during National Reconciliation Week this week.

The tram has been wrapped in Kardi Munaintya Chukapa (Emu Dreaming Story) artwork, which represents 39 Aboriginal language groups across South Australia and shows the journey of the Emu as it traverses the lands, going from one group to another, joining all.

Find out more about the artwork from its designer, Paul Herzich, in the video below.


Station facilities

It’s good to see staff making full use of the new staff facility at Adelaide Railway Station, which came into operation in April.

The refurbished space is a place where 400 rail operations staff can claim a home base, with a large kitchen, meeting areas, recreational areas, locker rooms, toilet and shower facilities, computers and quiet rooms where they can take a quiet moment to refresh between journeys.

The area covers 700m2 of floor space and is used for 21 hours a day, seven days a week.

A Man in a dark blue train driver's uniform with a hi-vis vest standing in front of a modern kitchen setting


Award winners

The team behind the delivery of the Replacement of Propulsion System in 3000 Class Railcars Project has been recognised with the Project of the Year, State or Local Government, award at the Project Management Institute Awards.

This was an important project that delivered real benefits to customers and substantially extended the life of the vehicles, while improving their reliability and comfort.

Thank you to all involved in this project and congratulations on a well-deserved win.

Three framed certificates, for Project of the Year finalist, Project of the Year - State or Local Government Winner and Project of the Year - State or Local Government Finalist


Jake signs on

DPTI staff recently did some great listening when they heard about six-year-old Yorke Peninsula resident Jake Croker, who has been on a mission to develop a road sign to alert motorists to the presence of shingleback lizards along roads in Innes National Park.

After young Jake designed his own sign, DPTI staff began collaborating with Innes National Park rangers to turn his vision into reality.

Staff recently presented Jake and his family with a draft of the official sign, along with plans to install several of them inside and around the national park. Watch his reaction below.


Wise words

The sentiments in an old booklet given to Rail Infrastructure Manager Shannon Fuller recently suggest the recipe for effective service is timeless.

The book on dealing with rail passengers was written by General Traffic Manager of the South Australian Railways Major Stanley Holm Watson, who held the position between 1935 and 1948, and its customer-first focus is the same focus we have across DPTI today.

The cover and three pages from the book. The cover is brown with black lettering and the title says


Vale Frederick Alan Wayte

We were sad to learn recently of the passing of Frederick Alan Wayte, who was the driving force behind the delivery of Adelaide’s highly successful O‑Bahn public transport network.

Mr Wayte, a respected engineer, joined the SA Highways Department in 1965 and later took on senior roles before being made assistant director, Transport Planning in the Department of Transport.

His work to explore and then deliver the O-Bahn guided busway technology became a 10-year mission, which today sees 30,000 passengers carried on daily journeys.

His lasting legacy will be long remembered and our thoughts and condolences are with his family.


Friday Flashback

Today’s Friday Flashback shows the intersection of Rundle Street and Pulteney Street, in 1927. Note the policeman on point duty, with horse-drawn carriages crossing the intersection.

A faded brown sepia photo which shows the intersection with a large old department store building in the background. The building has a lot of sale signs around it and there are a good number of people going to and from it. The foreground shows a horse and carriage moving across the intersection from left front to back and aprt of another one is exiting the intersection to the right. A policeman in a white helmet is on point duty in the lower right of the photo.SLSA B 3954