eNews February 2012

22 Feb 2012

Community grants

The Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) in partnership with the Motor Accident Commission (MAC) is offering community grants.

TravelSMART grants: provides funding to communities, organisations and workplaces for small scale projects that reduce car use and/or get more people walking, cycling or using public transport.

Community Road Safety grants (funded by the Motor Accident Commission): provides funding for small scale projects that aim to engage with local communities to create a culture of road safety and to influence safer use of the road network for the overall well being of the local community.

>> more information visit community programs web site

Rock up to the race - free

New road safety advocate and rising V8 Supercar driver Tim Slade made his heartfelt plea for responsible behaviour on the road while launching free public transport to the Clipsal 500 Adelaide thanks to the Motor Accident Commission (MAC), Adelaide Metro and the South Australian Motor Sport Board (SAMSB).

"It's just not worth being stupid on the road when you think about what can happen and the lifetime of sadness and regret," Mr Slade said.

"Safety is paramount in motorsport and racing is for the track, not for the road. At the end of the day we race in a controlled environment, unlike the roads we use every day, which can be unpredictable and dangerous. On the race-track all the traffic is driving in the one direction, we have tyre barriers and run-off areas, and we have fire marshals and emergency services. The cars we race are modified very heavily to cater for high speeds, unlike an average car. Our cars have a roll cage, a window net and the side windows are perspex not glass. We obviously wear helmets and are protected by a six-point seatbelt. " he said.

Anyone with a ticket to the Clipsal 500 Adelaide which will be held from Thursday March 1 to Sunday March 4 can travel to and from the event for free on any Adelaide Metro bus, train or tram.

>> more on the free public transport service go to www.clipsal500.com.au or www.adelaidemetro.com.au

Drivers handbook now easier online

The popular Driver’s Handbook is now easier to access online, providing essential information about South Australian road rules and road safety risks to drivers.

Each section of the book has been converted to webpages which provides not only a fantastic easy to access source of information, but also a new subscription facility.

This means that drivers can subscribe to receive emails on road rule changes and road safety tips throughout the year as they happen.

Some of the updated information in this edition of the handbook includes the use of mobile phones in cars, high powered vehicle restrictions for young drivers, common scenarios and consequences for those that lose their licence, road signs, overtaking heavy vehicles and trams and pedestrians.

The printed version is available from Service SA customer service centres and selected newsagents for $10, while the online version can be accessed at www.mylicence.sa.gov.au.

School's back so slow down

Road Safety Minister, Jennifer Rankine reminded motorists to slow down for 25 km/h speed limits in signed school zones.

“The 25 km/h speed limit applies in signed school zones when a child is present and at school crossings that have flashing lights operating,” she said.

“It’s also important to remember that a 25 km/h speed limit applies when passing a school bus – in either direction - that has stopped to pick up or set down children.”

Ms Rankine urged parents to be alert when dropping off or picking up their children and when reversing out of a driveway.

In South Australia nearly 20 children under the age of seven are killed or seriously injured and nearly 120 sustain minor injuries on the roads each year.

“If driving, remember a child properly secured in an approved restraint is less likely to be injured or killed in a car crash than one who is not,” Ms Rankine said.

“Please buckle up and make sure children up to the age of seven are seated in the mandatory, size appropriate restraints in the back seat.”

Children aged under four must be seated in the back seat of a vehicle that has two or more rows of seats.

Children aged between four and up to seven years are only permitted in the front of the vehicle in an appropriate restraint if all rear seats are already occupied by children under seven years.

>> more on 25km/h speed limits and road safety in school zones

>> more on child restraints


Operation consequence

SAPOL conducted Phase V of Operation Consequence, targeting drink and drug drivers, between 6pm on Saturday 11 February and 6.30am Sunday morning. Forty-seven motorists lost their driver's licence and 41 vehicles were impounded or had their wheels clamped for 28 days following a state wide operation targeting drink and drug drivers.

During the testing period, 6226 tests were conducted with a total of 75 drink driving and 7 drug related offences detected.

>> more


2012 ACRS National Conference

The Australasian College of Road Safety (ACRS) national road safety conference "A Safe System: Expanding the Reach" will be held in Sydney at The Menzies on 9 & 10 August 2012.

The primary aim of the conference is to provide a rich environment to encourage best possible outcomes for the Safe System approach to road safety.

>> more


Road works around the state

  •     Noarlunga to Victor Harbor Road - resealing works to improve the surface quality of the road commencing Saturday, 18 February 2012.
  •     Preliminary site investigation for Main North Road intersection began Monday 13th February 2012.
  •     South Eastern Freeway - resealing works commencing Monday 13th February 2012.


>> for full details visit DPTI latest news


Correction

There were 42 fatalities in the metropolitan area in 2011 - not 41 as reported in our 2011 Road Toll article in last month's edition.

>> read the full report on South Australia's road statistics of 2011


School's back so slow down

 

Road Safety Minister, Jennifer Rankine reminded motorists to slow down for 25 km/h speed limits in signed school zones.

“The 25 km/h speed limit applies in signed school zones when a child is present and at school crossings that have flashing lights operating,” she said.

“It’s also important to remember that a 25 km/h speed limit applies when passing a school bus – in either direction - that has stopped to pick up or set down children.”

Ms Rankine urged parents to be alert when dropping off or picking up their children and when reversing out of a driveway.

In South Australia nearly 20 children under the age of seven are killed or seriously injured and nearly 120 sustain minor injuries on the roads each year.

“If driving, remember a child properly secured in an approved restraint is less likely to be injured or killed in a car crash than one who is not,” Ms Rankine said.

“Please buckle up and make sure children up to the age of seven are seated in the mandatory, size appropriate restraints in the back seat.”

Children aged under four must be seated in the back seat of a vehicle that has two or more rows of seats.

Children aged between four and up to seven years are only permitted in the front of the vehicle in an appropriate restraint if all rear seats are already occupied by children under seven years.

>> more on 25km/h speed limits and road safety in school zones

>> more on child restraints

- See more at: http://dpti.sa.gov.au/towardszerotogether/article?item=71#sthash.3kFpe0IM.dpuf

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